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16 March 2016

Sela Pinanbasi initially heard about the Employer Engagement apprenticeship, while he was a participant on Talent Match London, a Big Lottery Funded employability programme led by London Youth. After impressing London Youth staff at the open interview day, Sela was invited to a second round of interviews and then offered the Employer Engagement apprenticeship position alongside Chloe Smith.

 

What attracted you to the Employer Engagement Apprenticeship?

I was a part of the Talent Match London youth board, and I loved the experience of working at London Youth. I initially wanted an internship, but when I saw the apprenticeship being advertised I thought it was a much better option for me. The prospect of working, whilst also gaining a qualification really appealed to me.

 

Has your apprenticeship been everything you thought it would be?

It’s been three months since I started my apprenticeship, and it has been much more fulfilling than I expected it to be. Initially I thought I would be spending most of my time with employers or in the office, however a lot of my time is spent out of the office, telling young people about the amazing employment opportunities open to them. Working with young people is a passion of mine, so I’m happy I get to support them.

 

How do you manage working and studying at the same time?

I’m doing a Business Administration Level three as part of my apprenticeship and it’s been really easy managing both. I spend one day a week at college and four days a week working. This structure helps me keep on track with both aspects of my apprenticeship.

 

Would you encourage others to apply for an apprenticeship?
Of course, it’s a great route. Instead of spending all your time at college studying, you get the opportunity to work and gain real life work experience. Plus it’s paid, so it’s the best of both worlds. You get real life work experience and a qualification and work reference to help you after your apprenticeship.

 

What can we do to get more young people involved in apprenticeships?
Young people need to be told about apprenticeships more early on. Instead of schools just pushing college as the only route available after school, they need to let young people know the full range of options available after school.